Category: Gpo startup script path

I recently went to deploy a new Powershell based Startup script in my test environment, and while the majority of my Windows machines happily complied, 2 of my test servers that were running Remote Desktop Services did not like the new Startup policy. The script itself was pretty straight forward — it pulled some files down from an IIS server, ran a script locally on the remote server to install some software and scheduled a task to automatically update that software.

Since this is a Startup script, it should be the machine account accessing the script, so I also made sure to give Domain Computers read access to the script. I honestly do not know if this was an issue caused by RDS or maybe some of the random patches I installed in hopes of fixing RDS bugs or maybe even that one time I had 2 separate AD Forests setup to auth through these servers talk about a good time.

This may not even have had anything to do with RDS, what I can say is that all of the machines in the environment were at least at the same patch level as far as I could tell. The processing of Group Policy failed. Windows could not resolve the computer name.

This could be caused by one of more of the following: a Name Resolution failure on the current domain controller. Startup script failed. First I tried creating some local host file entries to ensure DNS was resolved accurately, but this made absolutely no difference. At this point I was not sure what direction to go in as everything looked to be configured correctly, so to google I went. Unfortunately, since Group Policy has been around for a while, there is quite a bit of dated information and random fixes for these generic errors.

In my case, nothing I found was able to resolve my issue. New settings from 4 Group Policy objects were detected and applied.

The errors in the event logs were as follows: The processing of Group Policy failed.Forum Rules. Help Register Login. Forums Technical Windows 10 Group Policy scripts not running. Latest Threads. Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 Last Jump to page: Results 1 to 15 of However we've Group Policy scripts not running. On our W10 machines we have a handful of. However we've just noticed none of thes are working. As usual they work fine on the Win7 machines!

The errors being logged are either:. Last edited 23rd January at PM.

Might not be related at all, but I had similar problems when I tried running a script during GPO - said it couldn't find the file specified, even though when I typed the exact same 'launch command' from post-login it worked without issues. For me, it came down to who was really running the script when it was being launched, as I was referring to a drive letter, rather than a full UNC path. School boy error! Detention for me. I know the paths are correct as they are working on 's of W7 machines and haven't been changed.

It seems to be a pattern of Netlogon not seeing a domain controller, then not applying GPOs, then the GPOs logging the error that the script path wasn't found. Do these machines have SSDs? Originally Posted by Sheridan.

The errors being logged are either: or more commonly Neither of which is actually true. The PCs can resolve the paths in the first instance, and we're not blocking anything with group policy. We do use Applocker but that isn't logging anything as blocked.

I'm rather worried now that W10 is making a right balls up of applying GPOs, as the deeper I look the more issues I seem to find! Is anyone else running scripts in GPO's with W10? I'm not sure why it thinks. Looks like I might have bigger problems, each one is also logging this on boot: Everyone can still login though, and they're all 1Gb connections so I'm not sure why they can't pull down policies or scripts.

I like the idea of the auto-delayed service startup. I've actually done that for a handful of other services that I know can handle that kind of change and it certainly does speed things up just a little. Thanks gents.

Another thought Mines R2 at the moment as i've still got a couple of R2 DCs. Also, 3 of my DCs are virtual with the minimum resources possible.

I wonder if this is causing an issue too. Using scheduled tasks might address some issues, but we run a script to delete old profiles on boot - we would have to schedule this out of hours. Saying startup scripts are dead seems to be MS's way of saying 'we can't get W10 to work on a domain properly' We're at R2 functional level, probably will move up this summer but I can't see that fixing anything.

It does seem likely that the PC is booted up before the NIC is fully ready so delaying the netlogon service is worth a try.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. Server Fault is a question and answer site for system and network administrators. It only takes a minute to sign up. My personal's opinion is that after over a certain numbers of GPO, having all in netlogon can be hard to manage.

Not sure is this is "best practice", but I have seen a few blog post recommend this, and I prefer it:. We have a file share that contains all the supporting files for our GPOs, including scripts. The scripts are all checked into version control. In the GPO, you call the script "powershell.

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What are the implications if any of choosing one location over the other? Drifter 3, 2 2 gold badges 18 18 silver badges 35 35 bronze badges. BlueCompute BlueCompute 2, 1 1 gold badge 15 15 silver badges 27 27 bronze badges. Active Oldest Votes. I approve of this technique. The advantage is — as yagmoth already wrote — that scripts managed with a GPO are deleted if the GPO is retired read: deleted. Both location are sync'ed between domain controller, thus for me it's only a personal's choice.

Not sure is this is "best practice", but I have seen a few blog post recommend this, and I prefer it: We have a file share that contains all the supporting files for our GPOs, including scripts.

It also allows more control over how powershell.This topic describes how to use the Local Group Policy Editor gpedit to manage four types of event-driven scripting files.

You can use Windows PowerShell scripts, or author scripts in any other language supported by the client computer. For more information about the editor, see Local Group Policy Editor.

In the Script Name box, type the path to the script, or click Browse to search for the script file in the Netlogon shared folder on the domain controller. In the Script Parameters box, type any parameters that you want, the same way as you would type them on the command line. If you assign multiple scripts, the scripts are processed in the order that you specify. To move a script up in the list, click it and then click Up.

To move a script down in the list, click it and then click Down. Add : Opens the Add a Script dialog box, where you can specify any additional scripts to use. Edit : Opens the Edit Script dialog box, where you can modify script information, such as name and parameters. Remove : Removes the selected script from the Startup Scripts list. Startup scripts are run under the Local System account, and they have the full rights that are associated with being able to run under the Local System account.

This is a different behavior from earlier operating systems. Enabling the Run Startup Scripts Visible policy setting will have no effect when running startup scripts asynchronously.

gpo startup script path

In Script Nametype the path to the script, or click Browse to search for the script file in the Netlogon shared folder on the domain controller.

In Script Parameterstype any parameters that you want, the same way as you would type them on the command line. Remove : Removes the selected script from the Shutdown Scripts list.

gpo startup script path

Shutdown scripts are run as Local System, and they have the full rights that are associated with being able to run as Local System. Remove : Removes the selected script from the Logon Scripts list. Remove : Removes the selected script from the Logoff Scripts list. Skip to main content. Exit focus mode. Introduction Group Policy allows you to associate one or more scripting files with four triggered events: Computer startup Computer shutdown User logon User logoff You can use Windows PowerShell scripts, or author scripts in any other language supported by the client computer.

Deploy the Absolute agent via Group Policy (Startup Script)

In the results pane, double-click Startup. In the Startup Properties dialog box, click Add. In the Add a Script dialog box, do the following: In the Script Name box, type the path to the script, or click Browse to search for the script file in the Netlogon shared folder on the domain controller. Setting startup scripts to run synchronously may cause the boot process to run slowly. In the results pane, double-click Shutdown. In the Shutdown Properties dialog box, click Add.

In the Add a Script dialog box, do the following: In Script Nametype the path to the script, or click Browse to search for the script file in the Netlogon shared folder on the domain controller. Setting shutdown scripts to run synchronously may cause the shutdown process to run slowly.

In the results pane, double-click Logon. In the Logon Properties dialog box, click Add. Setting logon scripts to run synchronously may cause the logon process to run slowly.This topic describes how to install and use scripts on a domain controller. If you want information about script use for the local computer, see Working with startup, shutdown, logon, and logoff scripts using the Local Group Policy Editor. You can use Windows PowerShell scripts, or author scripts in any other language supported by the client computer.

You must be a member of the Domain Administrators security group to configure scripts on a domain controller. Right-click the Group Policy Object you want to edit, and then click Edit. In Script Nametype the path of the script, or click Browse to search for the script file in the Netlogon shared folder on the domain controller.

In Script Parameterstype any parameters that you want, exactly as you would type them on the command line. If you assign multiple scripts, the scripts are processed in the order that you specify.

To move a script up in the list, click it, and then click Up. To move a script down in the list, click it, and then click Down. Add : Opens the Add a Script dialog box, where you can specify any additional scripts to use. Edit : Opens the Edit Script dialog box, where you can change script information, such as name and parameters. Remove : Removes the selected script from the Startup Scripts list.

Startup scripts are run under the Local System account, and they have the full rights that are associated with being able to run under the Local System account. Startup scripts that run asynchronously will not be visible. Enabling the Run Startup Scripts Visible Group Policy setting has no effect when you are running startup scripts asynchronously.

Open the Group Policy Management Console. Right-click the Group Policy object you want to edit, and then click Edit. Remove : Removes the selected script from the Shutdown Scripts list.

Shutdown scripts are run as Local System, and they have the full rights that are associated with being able to run as Local System. Remove : Removes the selected script from the Logon Scripts list. Remove : Removes the selected script from the Logoff Scripts list. Skip to main content. Exit focus mode. Group Policy allows you to associate one or more scripting files to four triggered events: Computer startup Computer shutdown User logon User logoff You can use Windows PowerShell scripts, or author scripts in any other language supported by the client computer.

How to set up scripts on the domain controller To set up scripts on the domain controller Copy the script and dependent files to the Netlogon shared folder on the domain controller. Additional considerations You must be a member of the Domain Administrators security group to configure scripts on a domain controller.

In the results pane, double-click Startup. In the Startup Properties dialog box, click Add. In the Add a Script dialog box, do the following: In Script Nametype the path of the script, or click Browse to search for the script file in the Netlogon shared folder on the domain controller.

Additional considerations Startup scripts are run under the Local System account, and they have the full rights that are associated with being able to run under the Local System account. Startup scripts are run asynchronously, by default. Setting startup scripts to run synchronously may cause the boot process to run slowly. In the results pane, expand Shutdown. In the Shutdown Properties dialog box, click Add. Additional considerations Shutdown scripts are run as Local System, and they have the full rights that are associated with being able to run as Local System.

Setting shutdown scripts to run synchronously may cause the shutdown process to run slowly. In the results pane, expand Logon. In the Logon Properties dialog box, click Add.We have a Win2k3 domain with XP clients.

We have a batch file that runs fine either manually or by placing it in a users Startup folder. We have copied the script to the correct path and defined it in the Script name field but, it does not run.

The gpresult shows the GPO is applied to the computer. It seems like the Script parameters is where we are having the problem but we don't know what to do next. A parameter is just some information that you pass in to a script rather than it being hard coded in the script. For example lets say you had a script that sent an email, you might have parameters that let someone running the script specify who to send the email to and which SMTP server to use etc rather than hard coding the destination and SMTP server into the script itself and therefore having to manually modify the script every single time you wanted to send to a different person.

You can see an example of this within your script where you call msiexec. So basically I don't think parameters are your issue because you don't need to pass any parameters in to your script Besides, unless you are actually making use of the parameters from within your script then it doesn't matter what parameters you pass in - they will just be ignored.

If you want to grant all computers and users access to a network location then you can just grant the Domain Computers group access to the file. Alternatively you can use the Authenticated Users group as you mentioned but just be aware that this contains users as well as computers.

How To Assign a Logon Script to a Profile for a Local User in Windows Server 2003

I have found an application which can simplify the process of office deployment using the free pdq deploy software. Please see below for instructions on how this can be deployed onto your network:. We're using the following script attachedwhich contains code to check if Office is installed. Might sound daft but does the script work if it is run locally, Might help in finding the problem.

gpo startup script path

Adem - What makes you think it is the script parameters? Are you passing any parameters in to the script? It doesn't look like you need to if the line you posted is all that is in the batch file. Also where exactly did you place the batch file and what is the full path that you have specified in the script path part of the GPO?

Thanks for the all the responses. I have been frantically looking for scripting guides or examples that might explain more about scripts, languages and parameters I have a very small skill set when it comes to programming. Any advice on a learning path for scripting in Microsoft networks? Simon, the C: in the batch file is referring to the workstation. Please forgive me for my many questions I am simply trying to figure out a sensable solution.

Any recommendations on a complete learning path for scripting would be immensly appreciated! I will post the exact Events when I am back in the office. Logging on as local system using psexec.

Is there a log of what was processed in a GPO for each login? Would these types of logs be on the Domain Controller or do they not even exist?This site uses cookies for analytics, personalized content and ads. By continuing to browse this site, you agree to this use. Learn more.

How to auto start any website or program at windows startup

For a Microsoft Windows version of this article, see For a Microsoft Windows XP version of this article, see This article describes how to assign a logon script to a profile for a local user's account in Windows Server This logon script runs when a local user logs on locally to the computer.

This logon script does not run when the user logs on to the domain. If your computer is connected to a network, network policy settings may also prevent you from completing this procedure. In the console tree, expand Local Users and Groupsand then click Users.

In the right pane, right-click the user account that you want, and then click Properties. Click the Profile tab. In the Logon script box, type the file name and the relative path, if necessary of the logon script. NOTE : If the logon script is stored in a subfolder of the default logon script path, put the relative path to that folder in front of the file name.

For example, if the Startup. Click Applyand then click OK. NOTES : Logon scripts that are stored on the local computer apply only to users who log on to who local computer.

Local logon scripts must be stored in a shared folder that uses the share name of Netlogonor be stored in subfolders of the Netlogon folder. This folder is not created on a new installation of Windows. If you do not want to create the Netlogon share in the default location, put the logon script in any folder that the user can access during logon, and then share this folder.

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Deploy the Absolute agent via Group Policy (Startup Script)

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